Basil Karatzas to Speak at Caymans Shipping Conference

We are delighted to confirm just ten days before the event, due to outstanding business obligations, that Basil Karatzas will be presenting that the 5th Cayman Islands Shipping and Yachting Summit hosted by Mare Forum on May 1st, 2017. The conference is held during The Cayman Maritime Week in George Town, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands. The presentation by Basil Karatzas is expected to cover the expected implications on the shipping and maritime industries by the Trump Administration.

Part of working in the shipping industry! No complaints! Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Basil M Karatzas and Karatzas Marine Advisors Quoted in the News

We are delighted that Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co., and its founder Basil M Karatzas have become the contact to have for shipping market expertise; with prompt access to market information and a vast network and access to senior executives worldwide, in the shipping industry and several complimentary industries, the company has had a front row seat to today’s developments in the maritime industry and has been enjoying an active deal-flow and the trust of many in the shipping industry.

Five shipping and logistics influencers you should follow (Veconinter, March 13th, 2017)                                                                                                                            Basil Karatzas was named one of the shipping industry’s influencers by Veconinter, a Venezuela-based logistics company; tweets on shipping, and everything about it, by Basil Karatzas can be followed at @KaratzasMarine and @BasilKaratzas

Πήρε «φωτιά» η αγορά πλοίων μεσαίου τύπου για ξηρό φορτίο (Ναυτεμπορικἠ, March 14th, 2017)

ZIM Shipping Names New CEO in Face of Possible Sale (The Wall Street Journal, March 10th, 2017)

Gibraltar Shipping Interview: Basil Karatzas Talks Alternative Bunkers, S&P Markets, Vessel Financing, and Trump by Gibraltar Shipping (March 10th, 2016)

Ναυπηγήσεις – διαλύσεις, διπλή πρόκληση για τα bulk carriers (Ναυτεμπορικἠ, March 6th, 2017)

Still at sea Shipping’s blues: The many barriers to scrapping cargo ships (The Economist, March 2nd, 2017)

Σε «bad bank» το 5% του παγκόσμιου στόλου των containerships (Ναυτεμπορικἠ, February 15th, 2017)

Sinking Feeling: Shipping Is Latest European Banking Worry (The Wall Street Journal, February 10th, 2017)

From the crossroads to the world… Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

2017 03MAR07 N Ναυπηγησεις-διαλυσεις, διπλη προκληση για τα bulker carriers

The World Is Not Flat, Anymore

Only a few years ago, it seemed that our world, despite its spherical shape, was stretching to fit into a two-dimensional level playing field. The internet softly, almost hesitantly, started disrupting industries since the dot.com era, and technological innovations have been aggressively destroying market inefficiencies and rent-seeking industries ever since. During the last two decades, it had been easy to access information, to make decisions, to trade; it was easy for people to travel and for goods to be traded and shipped around. A few well-timed events (such as China’s accession to the WTO in 2001) only helped catalyze and amplify the impact of technology.

However, in the last couple of years, it seems that our world, especially when it comes to trade and shipping, sails against the winds. Clouds have been gathering slowly – politics and the outcome of elections are just a symptom for now, and trade volumes have been declining.

Basil M Karatzas had recently published an article in the Cayman Financial Review (Winter Edition) on the subject, mostly evaluating the topic from the shipowner’s point of view. The original article as posted online can be accessed by clicking here. A pdf version of the article from the print version / magazine can be be accessed by clicking on the image below.

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It seems flat… Click on the picture to access the pdf article. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

2017-02feb01-cfr-trade-and-shipping_the-world-is-not-flat-anymore

Sailing Winds on Wall Street

Shipping is an industry full of surprises. And, volatility. While until February this year the surprise mainly had been about the really terrible state of the freight market, the last few months have shown a tendency for the market to surprise on the positive side. Freight rates for the dry bulk market have moved to cash-flow positive levels in the last few months and tanker freight rates have been fair despite some relative weakness.

It’s a long way from saying that the market has recovered, no doubt. Many shipowners still remain in financial distress and several of the options available to shipping banks can only have adversarial impact on shipowners. But again, when shipping has been in a miserable stage for the last eight years, there are no overnight cures – short of a major macro or geopolitical event.

Besides freight rates, the overall mood for the market seems to be improving; we do not mean only shipowners, who by nature are always an optimistic bunch and they seem pre-conditioned to be looking to buy more ships – always. The capital market seem to have gotten a sense of euphoria too after the presidential elections in the US, whether on a sense of a perceived catalyst of definitely a new approach to governing or on the hopes of an infrastructure investment spree. The fact that capital markets didn’t melt after the results of the Italian elections last week is a further sign of pervasive optimism.

And, we are glad to see that market optimism getting tangible for shipping companies, especially for publicly listed companies. After several years of a bone-dry draught for IPOs and secondary offerings, the last month, just in time for the holidays, brought several successful fund raisings. Most recently, Seanergy of Greece (ticker: SHIP) raised $15 mil in a secondary offering and Safe Bulkers still of Greece (ticker: SB) raised $14 million the week prior; both companies are active in the dry bulk market and intend to finance vessel acquisitions with the proceeds. A couple of weeks ago, Costamare of Greece (ticker: CMRE) raised $72 mil in the containership markets and Höegh LNG of Norway (ticker HMLP) raised $106 mil in the LNG tanker market. A month ago, Saverys in Belgium raised $100 mil in the US for a blank check (SPAC) to acquire dry bulk vessels via their Hunter Maritime Acquisition Corp (ticker: HUNTU) investment vehicle.

The amounts involved are a small fraction of the golden days of the capital markets for shipping companies a decade ago; however, until recently it has been a very quiet market in the capital markets for IPOs and secondary offerings for all types of companies. However, this is a positive development under any light seen. All the offerings mentioned above took some serious effort and / or a serious management team and sponsor behind the companies to raise the money; and still, some of the raisings took place at a discount to the market. Thus, not all news is as rosy and sunny as they appear. However, again, we want to take the view that a successful raising today for shipping is a major accomplishment irrespective of the circumstances. These are five successful attempts for different amounts of money and circumstances and in three different industry segments, two of which (dry bulk and containerships) were left for dead four months ago. It shows in our opinion the resilience of the capital markets and the investor appetite for shipping overall. To that extent, we tend to take the view that the news is just fantastic!

Hopefully the momentum will continue and there will be more offerings in the new year. And, hopefully, any fund raisings will be utilized to build solid shipping companies or strengthen balance sheets of shipping companies and the capital markets will not serve as a fodder for speculative newbuilding orders as it happened a couple of years ago, a course of action that has been detrimental for both the instigators and innocent bystanders whereby the freight market crashed under the burden of huge tonnage oversupply. Hopefully there is a lesson to be learned here.

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Smooth seas… Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Another lesson to be learned too, hopefully, by the recent developments is that the capital markets, especially the US capital markets, are deep and substantial and can be depended upon for shipowners to keep raising money; as long as they have solid management teams and transparent corporate governance and decent business plans. All the companies mentioned above successfully check almost all of these points. Taking a broader historical view of the capital markets and shipping, there has been a wide and diverse populace of shipping companies that opportunistically went public in the last decade and now a few of them ended as penny-stocks or and others soon will be delisted. One cannot blame the market for some of these companies falling into hard times, but there is plenty of blame to go around seeing the management of these companies aggrandizing for themselves by exorbitant executive compensation packages, usurious vessel management agreements and plain old-fashioned self-dealing. Hopefully the present success of shipping companies raising money will be a painful reminder to some of the ailing companies that greed is not always good as it can kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.

We long have taken the position – and have advised our firm’s clients accordingly, that shipping finance is facing structural changes; the old model of committing to lending in shipping based on a hand-shake is extinct. Raising money from shipping banks is and will be getting tougher and more expensive. Capital will be coming to shipping in different ways (capital markets, etc) whereby only few owners will be able to benefit from. The work for shipowners adjusting to the new market circumstances is not done yet.

As we said earlier, we are a long way from a market recovery.


Disclaimer: Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co. has advised or otherwise has been involved with some of the market transactions referenced above. This article is strictly intended for information purposes.


The article was originally appeared on the Maritime Executive under the title “Setting Sail (Again) on Wall Street on December 13, 2016.


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Where the winds are strong… Image credit: Karatzas Images

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Basil M Karatzas and Karatzas Marine Advisors Quoted in the News

The shipping industry has been maintaining a very active profile in the mainstream international business press. Major bankruptcies, reorganizations, merges, vessel arrests and auctions are daily routine these days. Shipping banks, shipping loans actively and non performing loans (NPL) along with provisions are of concern or interest to many.  And, the  freight market that keeps surprising in terms of volatility.

We are delighted that Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co., and its founder Basil M Karatzas have become the contact to have for shipping market expertise; with prompt access to market information and a vast network and access to senior executives worldwide, in the shipping industry and several complimentary industries, the company has had a front row seat to today’s developments in the maritime industry and has been enjoying an active deal-flow and the trust of many in the shipping industry.

Dry-Bulk Shipping Owners Get Reprieve as Rates Rebound
(Wall Street Journal, November 24, 2016)

What Will Save the Shipping Industry? Eight Industry Thoughts Leaders Weigh In   (LLoyd’s List, November 17, 2016)

Taiwan Approves $1.9 Billion Aid Package to Troubled Shipping Companies
(Wall Street Journal, November 16, 2016)

Varsler shippinghavari (translated as ‘Warning Signs for Shipping’)
Dagens Næringsliv, (November 11, 2016 – In Norwegian)

Τα απόνερα από την εκλογή Τραμπ
(Η Ναυτεμπορικἠ, November 10, 2016 – In Greek)

Israel’s Zim Looking to Sell Most Global Shipping Operations
(Wall Street Journal, November 4, 2016)

Japan’s Largest Shipping Firms to Merge Container Operations
(Wall Street Journal, October 31, 2016)

Offen Group Selling Two MR Tankers
(Lloyd’s List, October 25, 2016)

Pressure on German shipping lenders unlikely to ease
(The Financial Times, September 21, 2016)

Guest Voices: Shipping Banks Face Sinking Prospects as They Postpone Reckoning
(Wall Street Journal, September 19, 2016)

It’s not over – Shipping industry adapting to difficult times
(Wärtsilä, September 12, 2016)

Shipping industry not buoyed by low fuel costs
(The Cayman Islands Journal, June 1, 2016)

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Aptly named containership vessel MV ‘King Basil’ departing the port of Piraeus. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Hanjin’s History Lessons

‘Time is the longest distance between two places’ concludes the Tennessee Williams’ character at the end of the play The Glass Menagerie. For a large number of creditors, vendors, tonnage providers, and predominantly shippers – with $14 billion worth of merchandise packed in containers onboard Hanjin ships, this philological expression was a very hard lesson to put to practice when the company filed for receivership at the end of August.  At present, and with everything going well, the best estimate is that Hanjin’s vessels will be unloaded by the end of October. A very long time indeed for shipping containers ‘lost’ between ports at today’s age.

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In better days… Image credit: Karatzas Images

The developments with Hanjin are still work-in-progress that may take several months, if not years, to settle permanently. For now, it’s a logistical nightmare bordering a legal saga that, in turn, stands on the periphery of the self-feeding financial crisis. Each one of these three parallel worlds will have to run their own course and trajectory, but again, not too far apart from each other. Definitely many lessons beg be learned once all is said and done, and the containers get delivered and the bills get paid, eventually. The fact that Hanjin Shipping has been the largest containership liner company bankruptcy ever (the second biggest was that of the United States Lines in 1986, when the boxship world was still in its infancy) will provide plenty of lessons on where the ‘stress points’ are in the system and the supply chain, and would provide some insight on whether the containership liner industry is a ‘systemic’ industry to the world’s trade.  There have been numerous financial restructurings and bankruptcies in shipping since the crisis ensued in 2008, but almost all of them were in the dry bulk and tanker sectors, where the logistical head-scratchers were much easier to address: usually there is one charterer or cargo owner per vessel per voyage in the dry bulk and tanker markets and not the plethora of cargoes and shippers and vendors with their boxes onboard a containership.

While it will take time to know the fine detail of the numerous parts interacting together in the liner business, a perfunctory view of the case, based on info available so far, indicates that all the factors one would expect to see in the cause of a default in the shipping industry were present in the Hanjin case.

The company, going after market and trying to keep up with the main players in the market, had effectively became a house of cards in terms of over-leverage, financially and operationally. Almost one hundred vessels (out of the 140 vessels under management) were chartered in, effectively with off-balance sheet, non-recourse financing. When the banks and lenders stop lending when one’s balance sheet gets stretched, an ambitious shipowner can just turn to the charter market and can pile up abundantly on tonnage based on their ‘signature’ and their (unsecured) promise to pay. No more than that is needed. Just a ‘sterling’ name and a ‘first class client’, as the saying goes, can be of enough assurance for charter payments and place a tall house a cards in short order. This was once a big deal even back then in 2008, for those who recall.

And, there were plenty of companies and shipowners who had been just happy to offer their tonnage on long term charters to Hanjin, just to show to their own shareholders and lenders that they had cash flow visibility and they were not speculators. Nice long charters with juicy cash-flows that paid until they stopped, that is. It may be worth asking whether such business practice was the result of poor risk management or just a case when no-one really questions whether the emperor may be naked. ‘If so many other tonnage providers had found Hanjin to be a quality charterer, who am I to stop chartering to them vessels’, one almost may be able to hear in a boardroom discussion.

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When days were great… Image credit: Karatzas Images

And, Hanjin was not just any charterer. They had real substance since they were a liner company and had access to the end user. If things turned bad for the market, as they did indeed, Hanjin would have cargoes to move and keep the ships busy and therefore keep making the lease and charter-hire payments. They had access to their own terminals (at least partially), and they had preferential access to S. Korea’s promising and export-oriented economy, and thus, they were supposed to have a backstop if things were to get ugly. As we learn now, a bad market is a bad market and it burns cash for stand-alone owners but also burns cash for strategic owners, like Hanjin, too. Notions of an end-user charterer are great, but again, a bad market can pinch sharply enough to make the pain felt on the bone of an end-user.

And, Hanjin was part of a substantial industrial conglomerate with strategic access to the ‘system’, that is the government and the state banks; it had to, as being a chaebol company, they had the implicit ‘put option’ of the government itself. And beautifully this was played until when the cash burn topped US$ 2 million per diem, and all the constituents had to look for alternative solutions. You can support a company-in-need for so long, but again, all love in this world has to have some limits.  And with Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM), the local competitor, reaching the restructuring altar in the summer first, there were one too many brides afterwards. There are still many more containership and liner companies that could be considered to have a quasi-government guarantee worldwide. Caveat emptor.

As much as we would like to believe that the Hanjin case will be an example to be held, one has to be doubtful. Time and again, defaults happen in shipping with almost metronomic frequency, and all the times, the same old factors drive those shipping companies to the ground, or the bottom of the sea for that matter: aggressiveness, over-leverage, poor risk management, over-reliance on fundamental assumptions that turn out to be fundamentally wrong, and wishful thinking.

But again, if it were not for all these surprises, shipping would be just any other boring industry. One-dimensional with ships floating beautifully over the ocean. Apparently, there is the dimension of time, at least until one gets their container delivered.


The article above was first published on Splash 247 under the heading ‘Hanjin’s Longest Voyage Yet’ on October 17, 2016.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Moral Hazard and Hanjin Shipping

Not a week has passed since we posted an article on the Maritime Executive’s website about moral hazard in shipping, and the shipping world got a big-proportions, real-life case study of the risks in the industry. We argued that when shipowners are over their heads in debt and with little promise of ever recovering any equity, there is precious little they care about financing, operations, trade, safety and even the environment.

Hanjin Shipping, based in South Korea and world’s seventh biggest containership company, filed for protection in S. Korean courts in late August, and subsequently started filing for protection in several jurisdictions worldwide, including in the United States federal bankruptcy court (filing for Chapter 15 restructuring in Newark, NJ). As of the end of second quarter this year in June, the company had outstanding obligations close to US$ 5.5 billion, approximately US$ 900 million of which due by the end of 2017. There were approximately US$ 700 million in equity on the balance sheet. Hanjin stands as the manager of appr. 142 vessels, 98 of which are containerships and 44 are tankers and bulkers. Only one-fourth of Hanjin’s fleet is self-owned, 38 of them owned and the rest chartered in from leasing companies and other financially-minded shipowners. The ownership mix of the tonnage indicates more of a light-asset, trading company rather an asset-heavy, ship-owning balance sheet. The current value of the owned fleet stands at appr. US$ 1.7 billion.

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Shipping crossing a bridge… Image Credit: Karatzas Images

Many details are still too opaque and covered by bilateral non-disclosure agreements, but where several of the counterparties have been publicly listed companies, one can draw certain conclusions: Hanjin had chartered in two 2010-built capsize vessels from publicly listed Navios Maritime Partners (ticker: NNA) MV ‘Navios Luz’ and MV ‘Navios Buena Ventura’ at a daily rate of US$ 29,356 pd each; the average spot capesize market was barely $6,000 pd during the last year, and presuming that Hanjin was trading the vessels on the spot market, they were losing $23,000 every single day for the last year ; of each of the two vessels. That is $16 mil down the drain for the two vessels in just the last year alone; each of the vessels had more than four years of employment remaining with the shipowner, and presuming that the spot capesize market would remain at present levels, Hanjin would had to suffer another $90 mil in losses for just these two vessels. Eight containerships chartered in from Danaos (ticker: DAC) had charter payment obligations of appr. $565 million. Similarly, three neo-panamax containerships from Seaspan (ticker: SSW) had outstanding charter obligations of close to US$ 370 million. These charter obligations add up to close to US$ 900 million, and under present market conditions, reasonable estimates would be for losses of more than US$ 500 million. And these are the calculations based on publicly available information for only thirteen of the 100+ vessels chartered-in, with only three counterparties. There are un-accounted obligations for more than eighty vessels that have been chartered in from other owners.

$23,000 losses every single day in the last year for each of the two capes chartered from Navios. Talk about destruction of value!

What options such a ‘shipowner’ like Hanjin (effectively a structured house of cards) does have under the circumstances? As one would suspect, very few. There is little in matter of equity, there is little in matter of collateral, there is lots of debt, and mostly, most of the debt is in relatively unsecured position since it’s in the form of charter obligations for the vessels that have been contracted on charter arrangements.

Playing the devil’ advocate and ask surreal but economically oriented questions: How much vested interest the shipowner has in the assets and the business? Precious little, at this stage. What are the odds that they will recover any equity? Probably better than hitting the jackpot in a national lottery, which we all know is not a fair proposition. What would any rational economic being would do? Briefly, either ask for the mercy of their creditors, or, having little to lose, just stop paying the creditors and pass the buck to the other side. What we called moral hazard in the previous posting.

Hanjin had been rumored (along with their co-patriot Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM)) to be facing financial problems and was an accident waiting to happen. HMM, being slicker, and faster, and part of a big chaebol (traditional corporate conglomerate structure in S. Korea, strongly affiliated with family management style and running businesses deemed strategically important to the State, in exchange of the State’s preferential treatment), managed in August to find their way out of their financial ‘pickle’. When Hanjin tried to secure the consent and more financing from their lenders (mostly Korean banks and the state-owned Korean Development Bank), there was little empathy. This would make perfect sense, as their lenders were in relatively preferred senior position, and any new financing would be considered either ‘throwing good money after bad money’ or diluting their position and getting lower on the seniority scale of claimants. It would make economic sense to refuse any new financing and let the un-secured creditors (that is the shipowners of the hundred vessels on charter to Hanjin, like Navios, Diana, Seaspan) accept a less demanding solution. Again, Hanjin and their prime financiers decided to drop the moral hazard bomb to the parties with a lower legal claim, the shipowners of the vessels.

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The good times left behind… Image Credit: Karatzas Images

Hanjin Shipping is the seventh containership company in the world but with only appr. 3% market, thus, belonging in the lower tier of containership companies as compared to behemoths like Moeller Maersk, Cosco, MSC and CMA CGM. A default by Hanjin cannot be expected to have a major domino effect on the overall shipping or containership world markets. The majority of Hanjin’s lenders were Korean banks, including the Korean Development Bank (KDB), and the Korean banking system (and the Korean taxpayer, if so required) can absorb the losses without posing a systemic risk to the Korean economy, at least at this stage. Hanjin had been a major carrier for LG electronics, but again, even Hanjin’s demise could not be detrimental to LG and the Korean electronics and manufacturing industries; not to mention, since HMM’s successful restructuring in the summer, now there has been an alternative, an alternative based in Korea itself (subsequent reports state the LG has already been shifting their shipment contracts to HMM). Thus, once the situation was ‘ring fenced’ and a fall-out was determined to be contained, Hanjin and its main creditors stopped paying to the lower standing creditors (other shipowners with charter-in tonnage). An example of moral hazard in all its glory.

Hanjin has filed for restructuring (and not for liquidation) expecting to find a way to save the company as a going concern over the long term. However, owners of vessels on charter to Hanjin, companies like Danaos, Seaspan, Navios and many other smaller, private owners, stand to lose the most. In an oversupplied market of low freight rates, it will be difficult to withdraw their vessels from Hanjin and seek equally profitable charter rates elsewhere in the present market; likely, they will have to accept lower and extended rates that Hanjin will offer them, and possibly some equity upside if and when the company recovers. Otherwise, the shipowners will have to seek legal remedies which are costly and time consuming, and always risky on whether there will be a chance to ever collect. After all, the events of last week have shown that Hanjin is not a systemically important company to the Korean economy, there is little the Korean constituents that can lose, there is little left for Hanjin’s management and shareholders to lose. Heads I win, tail you lose.

A case of moral hazard of the highest caliber.


A better edited version of this article was originally published on The Maritime Executive website on September 6th, 2016 under the title ‘Moral Hazard Case Study: Hanjin Shipping’.  This article builds on our essay on the dangers of the moral hazard in a weak freight market posted in early September in this post, when market participants were left with few options and little to lose, so much so that they care little for the outcome or the interests other constituents of the shipping industry.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.