Disruption Has Come to Shipping

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Only if I had a penny every time I had to spell out these terms to a financier dealing with commercial terms for the delivery of a vessel. It sounds almost like gibberish, but for those in the knowing, these are very clear terms and have saved many a shipowner or charterer from undue legal headaches. (For more shipping abbreviations, please see our S&P blog here!) These abbreviations are standard language and stand for All Going Well / Weather Permitting / Unforeseen Circumstances All Exempted / With Out Guarantee. They are the remnant of past reality, when Telex was the primary way of communicating commercial information in a time sensitive manner, and, text transmitted was charged by the number of the charterers consisting it. Really.

This was a time when people had to economize with their words due to technical and accordingly economic considerations. Had to be succinct since additional characters cost money; then, the telefax replaced the telex and transmitting was charged by the page, and eventually email has become the prominent way of transmitting information, which effective is free (besides a nominal monthly fixed cost for the connection). For those nostalgic of telex, Twitter had set a limit of 140 characters (now 280), but this was for other than economical considerations. And, the 280-character limit, Twitter does not stop someone for blabbing all they want; again for free.

The Internet has been changing the way the shipping industry is functioning. For starters, business has become much more transparent and efficient, and so far has affected the economics of auxiliary services such as ship-brokerage, charter brokerage, supplies and victualing, etc It has also affected documentation and certification for statutory and regulatory inspections, maintenance, communications, cargo and commercial documents, etc And, in the next phase of technology, the actual operations, management and trading of the ships are coming into focus.

When the Internet was “invented” in the 1990s and for the “dot com” mania, technology was still a novelty; too bulky and still very expensive in terms of computers and computer code, and, quite frankly, shipping was not the ideal industry for B2B (business-to-business) applications to start with. Two decades onwards, the cost of technology has come dramatically down, there are many app developers knowledgeable with new platforms, and more importantly, there has been a universal push to employ technology for both substituting for routine business and mainly “dig data” for making informed decisions. In the last decade, technology has had only an evolutionary impact on the shipping industry; however, looking forward, the impact can become revolutionary, or as they say, “disruptive”, in the sense it can disrupt existing industries from doing business “as always have been done”. Disruptive technologies effective force established industries to do business on a new set of economics and market drivers: physically hailing a taxi but now booking car service via an app (known standards of safety, security, timing, pricing, service, etc, with possibly automated cars in the future) is one of the most simplistic ways for one to understand “disruption”.

The impact of technology so far has been subdued and only limited to certain, well defined areas such as automation, digitization, etc It has just been complimentary to the industry by providing efficiencies and cutting costs, sometimes at the expense of shifting business models for a few complimentary service industries. However, looking forward, it seems we are almost of the cusp of major paradigm shifts that can change the market. For instance, brokerage – whether S&P and chartering – could be completely substituted by online platforms. What would stop a charterer from posting their business online and then get to choose the best bidder (ship) at the optimal price? What would stop a shipowner from posting their ship online for sale once the decision is made to divest of the asset? All these are commoditized products (cargoes, routes, ships, etc) and once a platform attracts critical mass, the market becomes much more efficient. And, execution of contract on an online platform, is just a formality.

As ships and cargoes getting connected, “Internet of Things” (IoT) can help with more efficient transport and optimizing the supply chain (translating to lower shrinkage, pilferage, spoilage, etc and of course lower financing trade costs). IoT can help from preventive maintenance onboard ships to minimizing to cost of repairs, but mainly can lead to automation of shipping and effectively to man-less ships. If airplanes with human cargo can be trusted on auto-pilots for most of the flight, it’s hard to see what would stop ships from navigating the seas on their own. And, one step further, “big data” and artificial intelligence can allow for predictive analysis of business trends and expected cargo movements. Probably, all these sound like a sci-fi scenarios with a remote hope of application. Instead of a counter-argument, one has to pay attention to a modern automobile and try to draw similarities to shipping. If a highly regulated and fragmented industry (automakers) with a much higher degree of human interaction can see their way to driver-less cars, it would not be too hard for ships to follow. Naval engineering remained a “bulk” and material-heavy discipline for the last several decades, just like cars used to be at Detroit’s glory days; however, a shift to more intellectual power is seems to be coming.

Ships are very expensive assets and often industry players prefer to stick with what it’s known and proven rather than take un-necessary risks; it’s an applaudable approach, but again, there is a paradigm shift when one has to jump into the future. Imaging being the last shipowner who built the last clipper ship only to see the steam engine cannibalizing the market. Change will come irrespective of the hesitancy by shipowners because other industries and companies from other industries will force their way on shipping. It is estimated that one-fifth of the containerized cargo moves on account of Walmart. While Walmart has taken a more cavalier approach to transport, Amazon has been much more aggressive and technology savvy. While at earlier stages, Amazon was completely dependent on UPS and FedEx for their shipments, now they building their own fleet of cargo planes and vehicles and hiring people for deliveries, just a step before deliveries with drones. It’s only a matter of time before Amazon will start shaking the containerized shipping industry. Would one think that other bulk commodity owners such as Vale, etc will not play the game?

Disrupted long time ago… Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

 

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Topical Insight and Current Developments in the Maritime Industry

Basil M Karatzas and Karatzas Marine Advisors Quoted in the News

We are delighted that Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co. and its founder Basil M. Karatzas have been the trusted and insightful source of market knowledge and intelligence for all things maritime; with prompt and accurate access to market information, a vast network of resources and paramount access to senior executives worldwide, in the shipping and complimentary industries, the company and its founding partner have had a front row seat to today’s developments in the maritime industry.

We always thought that we have had a strong advantage over the competition and nothing gives us higher pleasure than seeing our expertise appreciated beyond a constant deal-flow and boardroom discussions with our clients, and in the pages and the trust of the international business press.

Recent media quotations for Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors:

– China, Flush With Cash, Sets Sights on Shipping, The Wall Street Journal, December 23rd, 2017                                                                                                       On Chinese leasing and Chinese financing going aggressively after the international shipping finance market where western banks are retreating                                                                                                                                                                                           – Euronav to Buy Gener8 to Create Oil-Tanker Giant, The Wall Street Journal, December 21st, 2017                                                                                                       Consolidation in the supertanker (VLCC) market at a time of weak freight rates and soft asset prices with a transformative acquisition where a storied company goes from a consolidator to being a target                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           – Is the Dry Bulk Tramp Trade at an Inflection Point? The Maritime Executive, December 1st, 2017                                                                                                        Article penned by Basil M Karatzas for The Maritime Executive on the challenges the dry bulk market is facing and a blind repeat of the past and “buying low, selling high” dry bulkers may be more complicated this time around.                                                                                                                                                                                                         – Dry bulk: Why the Year of the Dog can wag its tail, Lloyd’s List, November 23rd, 2017                                                                                                                                  2017 has turned out to be a decent year for the dry bulk market; although it’s hard to see how it could be worse than 2016 (worst year in living memory), shipowners seem to got their faith back that the industry is not completely dead                                                                                                                                                                                                   – A Specter Is Haunting Europe’s Recovery: Zombie Companies, The Wall Street Journal, November 22nd, 2017                                                                                        Many chronically loss-making companies in Europe are kept alive because of the kindness of the banks. Shipping companies are part of the landscape.                                                                                                                                                                                           – JPMorgan making big profits by flipping cargo vessels, The Globe and Mail, November 19th, 2017                                                                                                        In a weak freight market leading to soft asset prices (“cheap ships”) some financial players see opportunity of buying ships at low prices, and occasionally flipping them soon thereafter for an easy profit

Manhattan from afar. Cruiseship MS ‘Queen Mary 2″ can be seen moored at the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal (right of the picture) in between the Empire State Building and  the 432 Park sky-scraper. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Is the Dry Bulk Tramp Shipping Industry at an Inflection Point?

As punishingly brutal as the shipping industry can be in bad times, it’s fulfillingly rewarding in good times. Who can forget the days from a decade ago when capesize bulkers were earning $250,000 per diem and the ships themselves were changing hands in excess of $150 million? We are a long way from those good old days but memories of and even hopes for prompt arrival of great times keep many a shipowner persevering in this business. It’s known that sweet memories and often hopes have on occasion been used to spruce up many “investment theses” in investment presentations.

The dry bulk tramp trade – whereby ships do not sail on a fixed schedule or published ports of call – has long been considered a textbook case of perfect competition in economics with its low barriers to entry and exit, minimal government and regulatory interference and taxation, an international market of price-takers for an un-differentiated product where no individual player – whether shipowner or charterer – has controlling influence on the market.

In such an individualistic market environment, fortunes have been made – and occasionally lost – when independent shipowners took timely risks and positioned their companies favorably on the dramatic upswing of the business cycle. Now that the dry bulk market is closer to the bottom than the peak of the cycle, there are calls to take risks for a market upswing.

Probably the timing is opportune for buying bulkers in expectations of an upswing in the market but one has to consider whether the dry bulk tramp market still is a market adhering to the rules of a perfectly competitive market. The last decade has seen many fundamental changes in the market that one has to wonder whether the old playbook is still working.

The greatest barrier to entry the shipping industry has been capital, given that this is a capital intensive industry. However, in past times shipping banks were providing generous financing in terms of financial gearing (leverage) and covenants, and even there have been cases of “name lending” and financing agreed on a handshake. Now that shipping banks have been departing the industry, and with the capital markets veering away from project finance and commodity shipping, private equity and other institutional investors have been depended upon to provide capital to shipping but at a much higher cost of capital, tighter terms and covenants and often for a share of the economics. The barriers to entry in terms of accessing capital have definitely been affecting the industry in an adverse way, in this respect.

In reference to government interference and regulation, for vessels having open registries (flags of convenience), the burden is still low in comparison to other onshore industries, but one can see the writing on the wall of higher regulation (and higher costs.) Emissions and the quality of bunker fuel have been making headline news in the last year resulting in both a higher financial component to the business and also technological and regulatory risk. Likewise for ballast water treatment plans, past the official deadlines, technology and approvals only now are getting sorted out. Likely, there will be higher risks for safety and security and ensuring that ships and the seaways supply chain are supported by hack-free systems (ransomware NotPetya have cost Maersk a few hundred million in losses in their last quarterly report, while the possibility of “hacked” ships became a prominent scenario in a recent wave of collisions involving US Navy ships in the Pacific.) And, while offshore registered vessels are taxed on the so-called “tonnage tax” system, many revenue-challenged jurisdictions and taxpayers have been taking a second look on the substantial differential in taxation in reference to domestically registered shipping companies and the potential loss of revenue. Taxation is a risk routinely mentioned in the prospectuses of all publicly listed companies in the US-capital markets and that the current favorable treatment by the IRS cannot always considered to be “a sure thing”. Thus, in an increasingly burdensome era of regulations (environment, safety, security, etc) and taxation, another of the legs of perfect competition seems challenged.

In theory, the “product” that dry bulk shipping companies “sell” is a “commodity” and “interchangeable” as all dry bulk shipping companies offer the service of transporting cargoes in bulk over the sea; as simple as that. And, although there are many charterers who only care for the basic good of cheap transport, an ever increasing number of quality charterers demand more than the “basic” service of transport: they demand quality ships and proper management systems and real time reporting and accountability, and also solid shipowners and managers free of financial risk of default. Thus, the “product” of the tramp dry bulk shipping slowly becomes less commoditized and more of a “service” whereby now ships and shipowners are not exactly interchangeable. Quality ships run by quality managers are preferred by charterers, but they still earn market price; and, in order to be profitable at market prices, critical mass of a fleet is required in order to access capital and also spread the overhead among a larger number of vessels. Thus, another tenet of the perfect competition model that dry bulk is a “commodity” good is slowly challenged.

At the end of the day, dry bulk shipowners in the tramp trade are “price takers” and will take what the market pays as there is little pricing power; again, a perfect competition characteristic. However, the case of just buying cheap ships and wait for the market to recovery will not necessarily hold true in this new market environment. One has to wonder whether the tramp dry bulk market, as a precursor to other asset classes – is slowly approaching an inflection point where “value added” services would be a differentiating factor.

“Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies”, as the quote goes, but one may has to start thinking that just hope alone of a market recovery similar to recoveries in previous business cycles may not be the case.


Article was originally was published on The Maritime Executive under the title “Is The Dry Bulk Tramp Market at an Inflection Point?” on December 1st, 2017.


Dry bulk vessel about to go under a bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Credit is due to Shipping Finance

The freight market has been disappointing recently, for dry bulk, tankers and containerships, while asset prices too have been on a softening trend, especially for tankers. As one would expect, traditionally the freight market gets most of the attention in shipping, for signs of strength with the hope that asset prices would be lifted too; however, we are of the opinion that shipping finance may be the key for successfully navigating the shipping markets going forward.

Having traveled extensively recently and having closed several S&P and structured, financial transactions, we can only be more convinced by the day that shipping finance is where the real battlefield lays for shipping nowadays. Access to finance, whether based on own funds or access to financing from third parties, is what sets shipowners apart in terms of survival and growth.

Shipping banks are done with traditional shipping and first preferred ship mortgages. Yes, we have seen a couple of occasions where European banks are still lending at 300 bps spread over Libor, but they are so selective and have such a limited capacity that effectively such lending activity only confirms the fact that shipping banks are not active for most practical purposes. Thus, cheap debt financing is no more.

Shipping credit funds have made lots of noise in the last year, and we estimate that they have deployed close to a billion dollars in the last eighteen months; still, they are too afar from financing the average shipowners, notwithstanding the temptation in this desperate market for debt financing. Credit funds typically look for 8% minimum yield before any fees, equity kickers and other incentives, which limits their applicability to only second hand vessels that are priced at a multiple of the collateral’s scrap value; financing the acquisition of a resale capesize vessel with excess $30 mil acquisition price and paying 8% yield, one may as well try their luck in Las Vegas and try to have a good time while they are at it. Thus, credit funds can have parodical application.

Private equity funds having made ill-timed “bets” in 2011-2014 in shipping (and we consciously use the term “bets”), now they stand licking their wounds and trying to devise ways to cut their losses short. Never mind grandiose plans for IPOs, market consolidation and bringing turn-around expertise and making a commitment to the industry; we have been the busiest we have seen with advisory, market intelligence, valuation, industry expertise services for disputes, arbitration and litigation between shipowners and financial investors. So much for hopes that private equity could feel the funding gap left in the wake of shipping banks leaving the industry.

True, there are still shipowners with deep pockets who have kept buying vessels well into 2017, despite the asset price bounce compared to all time lows in 2016 for the dry bulk market; however, there are few shipowners that indeed still have deep pockets. German owners may feel sick that they lose ships to other markets and especially to the Greek market, and this can be true to an extent, but on the other hand, few shipowners have been buying and can keep buying on a sustainable basis; most shipowners with ‘seed money’ are almost maxed out and looking for third-party money if they were to keep buying.

Shipping finance is really the battleground for modern shipping these days, the industry’s ‘soft underbelly’. While one can keep projecting on tonnage demand growth and developing trade patterns, shipping finance will be the field that will make or break shipowners. Shipping finance is getting to be ever more challenging and there is no realistically any reason that the picture will get brighter in the future. Yes, for few publicly listed shipping companies with critical mass, real business plans and solid corporate governance, capital markets can still be the way to go. But for most of the independent shipowners and several of the penny-stock listed shipping companies, shipping finance would be the critical link in their survival and / or success.

Based on reports from a recent shipping conference in New York – which purposefully we did not attend, we have seen that “M&A” and “consolidation” were the buzzwords of the day. But again, in a market that is as dead in activity as a coffin floating after the sinking of the „Pequod” in Moby Dick, whether for IPOs, etc (even a SPAC sponsored by the blue blood Saverys’ shipping family has failed) or follow-ons, hopes for “M&A” and “consolidation” have to do. And, statements that shipping and commercial banks ought to be considering shipping again, given that the industry is “low volatility”, humored us for reminding us the proposed “Hamburg Formula” for vessel valuations  of almost ten years ago where the shipping industry was suggested to be an industry of low volatility and risk and the suggested cost of capital was a whole of 50 basis points over the T-bill, then.

Solving the shipping finance riddle is really a critical point for most of the shipowners to address going forward, the direction of the freight and asset pricing markets.


This article first appeared on Splash 24/7 on June 23rd, 2017, under the title “Credit is due to Shipping Finance”.


Manhattan, New York City: An ever more critical place for shipping finance. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Basil Karatzas to Speak at Caymans Shipping Conference

We are delighted to confirm just ten days before the event, due to outstanding business obligations, that Basil Karatzas will be presenting that the 5th Cayman Islands Shipping and Yachting Summit hosted by Mare Forum on May 1st, 2017. The conference is held during The Cayman Maritime Week in George Town, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands. The presentation by Basil Karatzas is expected to cover the expected implications on the shipping and maritime industries by the Trump Administration.

Part of working in the shipping industry! No complaints! Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Basil M Karatzas and Karatzas Marine Advisors Quoted in the News

We are delighted that Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co., and its founder Basil M Karatzas have become the contact to have for shipping market expertise; with prompt access to market information and a vast network and access to senior executives worldwide, in the shipping industry and several complimentary industries, the company has had a front row seat to today’s developments in the maritime industry and has been enjoying an active deal-flow and the trust of many in the shipping industry.

Five shipping and logistics influencers you should follow (Veconinter, March 13th, 2017)                                                                                                                            Basil Karatzas was named one of the shipping industry’s influencers by Veconinter, a Venezuela-based logistics company; tweets on shipping, and everything about it, by Basil Karatzas can be followed at @KaratzasMarine and @BasilKaratzas

Πήρε «φωτιά» η αγορά πλοίων μεσαίου τύπου για ξηρό φορτίο (Ναυτεμπορικἠ, March 14th, 2017)

ZIM Shipping Names New CEO in Face of Possible Sale (The Wall Street Journal, March 10th, 2017)

Gibraltar Shipping Interview: Basil Karatzas Talks Alternative Bunkers, S&P Markets, Vessel Financing, and Trump by Gibraltar Shipping (March 10th, 2016)

Ναυπηγήσεις – διαλύσεις, διπλή πρόκληση για τα bulk carriers (Ναυτεμπορικἠ, March 6th, 2017)

Still at sea Shipping’s blues: The many barriers to scrapping cargo ships (The Economist, March 2nd, 2017)

Σε «bad bank» το 5% του παγκόσμιου στόλου των containerships (Ναυτεμπορικἠ, February 15th, 2017)

Sinking Feeling: Shipping Is Latest European Banking Worry (The Wall Street Journal, February 10th, 2017)

From the crossroads to the world… Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

2017 03MAR07 N Ναυπηγησεις-διαλυσεις, διπλη προκληση για τα bulker carriers

The World Is Not Flat, Anymore

Only a few years ago, it seemed that our world, despite its spherical shape, was stretching to fit into a two-dimensional level playing field. The internet softly, almost hesitantly, started disrupting industries since the dot.com era, and technological innovations have been aggressively destroying market inefficiencies and rent-seeking industries ever since. During the last two decades, it had been easy to access information, to make decisions, to trade; it was easy for people to travel and for goods to be traded and shipped around. A few well-timed events (such as China’s accession to the WTO in 2001) only helped catalyze and amplify the impact of technology.

However, in the last couple of years, it seems that our world, especially when it comes to trade and shipping, sails against the winds. Clouds have been gathering slowly – politics and the outcome of elections are just a symptom for now, and trade volumes have been declining.

Basil M Karatzas had recently published an article in the Cayman Financial Review (Winter Edition) on the subject, mostly evaluating the topic from the shipowner’s point of view. The original article as posted online can be accessed by clicking here. A pdf version of the article from the print version / magazine can be be accessed by clicking on the image below.

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It seems flat… Click on the picture to access the pdf article. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

2017-02feb01-cfr-trade-and-shipping_the-world-is-not-flat-anymore